Service procedures tagged posts

3DVIA Composer at Hannover Messe 2009

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Hannover Messe

Visit us at Digital Factory at Hannover Messe, Hall 17.0, Booth C40 from April 20-24, 2009!

We invite you to visit us at Hannover Messe. Take a look at 3DVIA Composer – “the revolution for product documentation.” Meet our partners from Dassault Systèmes and SolidWorks and see how 3DVIA Composer can help you deliver user manuals, work instructions, product information, and service and training materials directly from your 3D CAD data – and always keep it up-to-date.

Talk with our specialists from our Business Partners and receive first-hand information about all the advantages of our Dassault Systèmes PLM and SolidWorks solutions. During the fair we are available for all your questions from 9:00am to 6:00pm every day!

3DVIA – this is “3D for All...

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3DVIA Composer auf der Hannover Messe 2009

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Hannover Messe

Besuchen Sie uns auf der Digital Factory der Hannover Messe, Halle 17.0, Stand C40 und E40 vom 20.-24.04.2009!

Wir laden Sie herzlich zu einem Besuch auf der Hannover Messe ein. Nutzen Sie dort die Möglichkeit sich über die „Revolution in der Produktdokumentation – 3DVIA Composer“ zu informieren. Wir zeigen Ihnen gemeinsam mit unseren Partnern von Dassault Systems und SolidWorks wie Sie Handbücher, Arbeitsanweisungen, Produktinformationen, Trainings- und Serviceanweisungen direkt aus Ihren 3D-Daten erstellen können – und dabei immer auf dem neusten Stand bleiben.

Treffen Sie die Spezialisten unserer Partner und erfahren Sie aus erster Hand die Vorzüge der Dassault Systèmes PLM und SolidWorks Lösungen...

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3DVIA your iPod #71: Standard Icons from Xype

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xype-sample.png

Here is a great sample given to us from Richard Hale of Xype. The effective use of standard icons is prevalent in this example, and is used to ensure efficient information transfer from the author to the consumer of the data. Standardized icons and symbols ensure that the end user has a consistent visual aid to accompany the animated procedure. The icons can also be used as “hotspots” or links to provide an enhanced level of interactivity with the 3D document.

Thanks to Richard for sharing this sample and for showcasing how a simple standarization can further enhance the learning curve to add coherence and reliability for all parties involved.

If you have a sample tip, technique, or just want to share what you are doing, please drop us an email at editor@3dmojo.com...

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3DVIA your iPod #69: “Compound Motion Paths”

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compound-motion1.png 

Back in podcast episode #44, you saw how easy it was to create complicated motion paths using the simple technique of combining assembly movements with part movements.

Yesterday I was browsing the 3dmojo forum, and I found a very good question posted by 3DComposter (clever and humorous username, by the way!). I thought the answer to this question would make a perfect podcast episode — how you can create a complicated motion path using very simple techniques.

Enjoy this podcast episode, and please feel free to continue posting questions to the forum. And if you have created any of your own interesting animation techniques, please feel free to share them with us by posting them directly into our forum under the “Share It” thread.

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3DVIA Composer to be featured at the COE PLM Conference

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stadium.jpg

Newsflash: 3DVIA Composer has been added to the breakout session grid at COE!

Chris Williams, the General Manager of 3DVIA Enterprise, will host an in-depth session titled Revolutionizing Design Communication: Creating Product Information with 3DVIA Composer. This presentation and discussion will begin on Tuesday, April 29 at 4:30 pm, as part of the “COE Briefing Center #1” track, in the Australia 3 room. This news is so late-breaking that the COE website has not yet been updated with this information.

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Making 3D particles in a beaker

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3d particles in a beaker 

I was reading, and frankly, not completely understanding, this very interesting story in the MIT Technology Review about the creation of 3D particles in a new chemical process and it got me to thinking about the “end state” of ubiquitous 3D.

I wondered what the cultural and business meaning is of particles with “precisely structured internal parts”, a sort of 3D chemistry that expands 3DVIA Composer’s “product information everyware” vision in ways we’ve never thought about before.

What if the vision isn’t just about 3D for everyone, but becomes instead 3D chemistry in everyone? 

When microfluidics can efficiently make “particles with exquisite internal structure” don’t we have a classic assembly? Would there be a product tree for these particles?

It’s fun to speculate about what a ...

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Wow…what a reaction

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cupoverflowing1

It’s been a very fulfilling and exciting 24 hours for everyone in Seemage since our acquisition by Dassault was announced.

First, I want to give a shout-out and thank-you to some of the more authentic bloggers in the community, people like Robin Capper (post here), Chris Kelley (here) and Josh Mings (here), for noting our big news and for encouraging us to continue the blog. We will.

We wouldn’t be true-to-form, however, if we didn’t have a response to the “traditional” CAD press, as expressed in their blog posts on the acquisition (Ralph Grabowski’s comment here and Randall Newton’s here).

Trust me, we don’t give a whit for Autodesk’s “tags” (whatever that’s supposed to be)...

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Dassault Systèmes acquires Seemage

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It is with great pleasure that we announce today that Seemage has been acquired by Dassault Systèmes. The complete press release can be downloaded using the link below.

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Talking heads or product showcase…you decide

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Seemage’s approach to marketing couldn’t be more different from Right Hemisphere’s

Last week, I watched a replay of Right Hemisphere’s recent webinar and then, for comparison, I watched the replay of our most recent webinar.

You couldn’t find a more different approach in the way the companies choose to present themselves and their technology. Our competitor chose to present an hour of discussion on the future of PLM. We chose to present our product in a live demonstration, using real customer data, in what we believe is a real-life example of typical problems people face creating rich product documentation.

I am astonished that in the 56 minutes of Right Hemisphere’s webinar they showed no product demo at all. By contrast, we begin to demonstrate Seemage as quickly as possible...

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No one says it better than customers

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Side from Gordon Benson’s presentation at the PLM Road Map conference, September 2007

Last week at the PLM Road Map 2007 conference, Gordon Benson of NMHG gave a presentation on his company’s success in using product information in many different areas of their operations. Gordon has kindly consented to allowing us to post the presentation here for you to browse.

I picked the slide you see here to be the graphic image for this post because it summarizes why Seemage is in business: to help companies share and reuse this fundamental information. By the way, it also shows how manufacturers are beginning to realize and respond to the impact digital product definition data has on their operations.

Gordon presented this information in a way that draws on his many years of experience working with technology companies...

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Seemage your iPod #45: “Cloning geometry”

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Seemage podcast for CAD and PLM users, episode 45, Cloning geometry

This week Jonathan Riondet elaborates on one of the features that users consistently tell us makes Seemage so useful: the ability to substantially reduce the size of files. In this example, Jonathan shows how to take an already-small Seemage file and by cloning geometry in the file, reduce the size of the Seemage file even more.

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PTC to technical service writers: “One size — XXXL– fits all”

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PTC to technical service writers: one size — ginormous — fits all

Many of you may remember the rock band called Talking Heads. And you may also remember their famous movie, Stop Making Sense, in which lead singer David Bryne appears onstage in an ill-fitting “big suit.”

Both the title of the film and the fit of the clothes pretty aptly describe what we think of Parametric Technology’s announcement of a “comprehensive, out-of-the-box solution for creating, publishing and delivering technical service manuals.”

We wonder why you need four separate applications – none of which are widely-deployed standards – to author content. Will tech writers prefer Microsoft® Word® or Arbortext® Editortm? How eager do you think users are to learn a new text editing tool? PTC’s press release says, “The success of any new solution hinges on an organizationâ€...

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Unexpected modernity for CAD and PLM

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Technical illustrators will be happier using Seemage

Whenever we get a chance, we take the opportunity to share our product information everyware vision with industry analysts and journalists. Having been part of those meetings for a year now, there’s a consistent reaction when the product architecture behind our vision becomes clear to the analyst or journalist: they have an epiphany.

Last week, an analyst we were briefing had the classic full-body reaction and, suddenly, he grokked Seemage. Then he said, “But unless you explain this more, you won’t ever become famous for your architecture.”

Our response? People don’t (or shouldn’t) buy IT architectures. They do (and should) buy products...

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Are you still in the “darkroom” about CAD file formats?

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Using drawings to create product documentation is like using chemistry for photos instead of a digital camera

We’re back from a long holiday weekend here in the US, and I wanted to pick up the discussion thread started last week when we posted our assertion that the file translation problem has been solved.

Articulating that fact resulted in this comment from Deelip Menezes:

In the response to Scott Shepard, Alex says, “the manic focus on converting things obscures the need to do something with the info”. I could not agree more. I have a small question though. How the hell are you going to do something worthwhile with the info if you do not have the correct info to begin with?

With apologies to Deelip, I don’t want to get pulled into the sub-topic of file-format conversion accuracy, because that is, ahem, a religious war without solution.

Suffice it to say that I am happy to use a digital came...

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Seemage your iPod #42: “Path Planning”

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Seemage podcast for CAD and PLM users, episode 42, Seemage Path Planning

This week’s Seemage podcast episode is presented by Franck Soulier who demonstrates Seemage Path Planning. First, Franck shows how Seemage can solve an abstract problem very easily: the path a ball must take to get out of a maze. That alone would make this a gripping video to watch. But then Franck goes further to show us a real-life application: how to remove parts in a maintenance situation.

Don’t you wish the engineer who put spark plug #8 under the air intake in your car had used Seemage path planning? I certainly do.

Thanks so much to Franck for the great video, and as always, we welcome your comments on this podcast and our blog in general.

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A user’s perspective on Seemage

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Seemage is used to document Hyster forklifts

We are very pleased to post here an unabridged version of the article Gordon Benson of NACCO Materials wrote for Machine Design magazine.

As you read Gordon’s paper, we hope you will agree that the issues and challenges Gordon describes are universal no matter what CAD and/or PLM system your company uses, and that his approach to solving those problems in his company is applicable to your company as well.

Gordon places special emphasis on the ROI of better product documentation, something we believe is more and more evident inside manufacturing companies today. It’s the kind of thing you might expect software vendors to talk about. But it’s so much more authentic reading Gordon’s perspective than simply hearing it from us.

We want to thank Gordon for allowing us to post the original...

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CAD file conversion misses the bus

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Thinking about CAD file format conversion without content creation is like missing the bus

Here at Seemage, we marvel at the amount of time and energy people spend thinking about file format conversions. In a nutshell, we believe this is a solved problem…that people who want or need to convert file formats can and do, easily and accurately.

We think the real issue isn’t about conversion…it’s about content creation. Customers tell us they need technology to allow departments outside engineering and design to create useful, accurate product deliverables. Our customers’ real challenge is to make it possible for end-users to achieve this in a compatible, secure way. (Naturally, we think Seemage matches this customer need perfectly.)

So, it never ceases to amaze me when I read a review of a product whose entire purpose…its complete market aspiration…its raison d’être is ...

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Seemage your iPod #41: “Using Seemage with Solid Works, part 2″

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Seemage podcast for CAD and PLM users, episode 41, Using Seemage with Solid Works, part 2

This is the second of two posts demonstrating the new integration of Seemage with SolidWorks.

Of note in this video is Jonathan’s demonstration of the ability to access all the detailed user information that was originally in the SolidWorks model directly in Seemage.

Read our press release announcing the integration here. Sign up to attend our free webinar on Wednesday, August 29, 2007 showing SolidWorks and Seemage integration here.

To play the .avi file, you will need a TechSmith codec, available here.

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Seemage your iPod #41: “Using Seemage with Solid Works, part 1″

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Seemage podcast for CAD and PLM users, episode 41, Using Seemage with Solid Works, part 1

This week we have a special two-part podcast. In this post and the next, Jonathan Riondet features our new integration with SolidWorks, which as you will see, is as easy to use as making a menu selection.

In this first part, Jonathan shows some animation capabilities using a SolidWorks model. In passing, he mentions something that I think is very important: that the Seemage file created by the free plug-in can be opened in any Seemage product, including the free Seemage Player.

We’re very excited about Seemage’s integration with SolidWorks. You can read our press release announcing the integration here. Also, on Wednesday, August 29, we are holding a free webinar that will demonstrate the integration between Seemage and SolidWorks. Attendees are eligible for a free copy of Seemage Viz...

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Snecma Services Flies with Seemage

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Seemage is pleased to announce that Snecma Services is using Seemage as a vital part of its training and educational services. Read the press release below.

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Seemage your iPod #40: “Seemage Collision Detection”

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Seemage Interactive Collision Detection

This week for our 40th episode (!!), Jonathan shows a capability in Seemage that we all know would lead to better product quality: the ability to detect serviceability issues. Seemage Interactive Clash makes it quick and easy for users who must document (and use!) service procedures to see exactly what will happen under various circumstances. We’ve all opened the hood of a car and wondered, “Sheesh….how would I remove spark plug #6?” With Seemage, you’d know. And this animation could be easily supplied on CD or a website to the service people at the dealership.

As impressive as clash detection is, note what Jonathan does after discovering the clash: he non-disruptively imports updated information into the scenario to resolve the issue...

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Choose one: text or animations for nuclear powerplant training

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Text is not the answer to better product documentation

I was reading the “Engineers without Fears” blog and came across this post in which Matt Moore describes some of the core issues that arise in documenting very complex products, especially their long lifespan and the need to transfer information from one person to another over multiple careers.

Matt summarizes the problem succinctly:

Powerplants and fighter planes tend to be expensive and have long lifespans (as long or longer than the career of individual). Given that a proper understanding of how a complicated product operates takes a long time to build (often 10 years minimum), knowing who knows what around a specific component or assembly is vital. And yet often it is not known.

We agree these are important issues...

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